Comments on GitHub commits?

You can apparently leave comments on GitHub commits (instead of commenting at Phabricator, or directly sending a reply to the relevant commit mailing list and relevant CCs). I once accidentally did that myself (<https://github.com/llvm/llvm-project/commit/4a6861a7e5b59be24a09b8b9782255d028e7aade#commitcomment-35540755>) and now (presumably because I'm member of some GitHub group) got mail about <https://github.com/llvm/llvm-project/commit/2724d9e12960cc1d93eeabbfc9aa1bffffa041cc#commitcomment-35724925>.

Do we want to allow such comments?

If we do, are intended recipients of such comments (esp. in a case like mine above, where there was no @... in the comment and I intended to reach at least the commit's author) reliably informed about them (i.e., is it guaranteed that they will receive a mail)?

If we don't, is there a way to block such comments on GitHub (and give a message about the preferred communication channels)?

You can apparently leave comments on GitHub commits (instead of commenting at Phabricator, or directly sending a reply to the relevant commit mailing list and relevant CCs). I once accidentally did that myself (<https://github.com/llvm/llvm-project/commit/4a6861a7e5b59be24a09b8b9782255d028e7aade#commitcomment-35540755>) and now (presumably because I'm member of some GitHub group) got mail about <https://github.com/llvm/llvm-project/commit/2724d9e12960cc1d93eeabbfc9aa1bffffa041cc#commitcomment-35724925>.

Do we want to allow such comments?

I think we would like this disabled, but I don't think it's possible.
Or at least I haven't found a way to do it yet.

-Tom

Not automatically as far as I can tell. One can manually “lock the conversation” on a commit but that’s about it.

From what I’ve seen on other projects, comments on raw git commits are rare and self-limiting. The only reasonable responses are “okay”, “okay, file a bug”, and “okay, please submit a patch”. I also haven’t verified this, but I suspect only the commit author gets notified, which prevents idle people from piling onto to the conversation.

Dave

Watchers of the repo get the comments (just like pull-requests).

I suspect that moving to a system where people are watching the repository instead of subscribing to the mailing-list is likely unavoidable at some point.

You can apparently leave comments on GitHub commits (instead of commenting at Phabricator, or directly sending a reply to the relevant commit mailing list and relevant CCs). I once accidentally did that myself (<https://github.com/llvm/llvm-project/commit/4a6861a7e5b59be24a09b8b9782255d028e7aade#commitcomment-35540755>) and now (presumably because I'm member of some GitHub group) got mail about <https://github.com/llvm/llvm-project/commit/2724d9e12960cc1d93eeabbfc9aa1bffffa041cc#commitcomment-35724925>.

Do we want to allow such comments?

I think we would like this disabled, but I don't think it's possible.
Or at least I haven't found a way to do it yet.

Not automatically as far as I can tell. One can manually “lock the conversation” on a commit but that’s about it.

From what I’ve seen on other projects, comments on raw git commits are rare and self-limiting. The only reasonable responses are “okay”, “okay, file a bug”, and “okay, please submit a patch”. I also haven’t verified this, but I suspect only the commit author gets notified, which prevents idle people from piling onto to the conversation.

Watchers of the repo get the comments (just like pull-requests).

I suspect that moving to a system where people are watching the repository instead of subscribing to the mailing-list is likely unavoidable at some point.

Then again, watching the repository will ultimately be like
subscribing to llvm-commits, won't it? How many people do _that_ and
actually track what happens? I personally can't imagine doing that
without some serious automatic filtering...

Cheers,
Nicolai

>> From what I’ve seen on other projects, comments on raw git commits are
rare and self-limiting. The only reasonable responses are “okay”, “okay,
file a bug”, and “okay, please submit a patch”. I also haven’t verified
this, but I suspect only the commit author gets notified, which prevents
idle people from piling onto to the conversation.
>>
>
> Watchers of the repo get the comments (just like pull-requests).
>
> I suspect that moving to a system where people are watching the
repository instead of subscribing to the mailing-list is likely
unavoidable at some point.

Then again, watching the repository will ultimately be like
subscribing to llvm-commits, won't it? How many people do _that_ and
actually track what happens? I personally can't imagine doing that
without some serious automatic filtering...

Not sure what you mean by "actually track what happens."
I subscribe, and I skim the subject lines nearly every day, to see
whether anything interesting has happened. I actually *read* maybe
1 or 2 percent of the traffic. In order for automatic filtering to
work, I'd need to decide ahead of time what keywords and/or people to
care about. I'd rather not look at the project with such blinders in
place.
--paulr

From what I’ve seen on other projects, comments on raw git commits are

rare and self-limiting. The only reasonable responses are “okay”, “okay,
file a bug”, and “okay, please submit a patch”. I also haven’t verified
this, but I suspect only the commit author gets notified, which prevents
idle people from piling onto to the conversation.

Watchers of the repo get the comments (just like pull-requests).

I suspect that moving to a system where people are watching the

repository instead of subscribing to the mailing-list is likely
unavoidable at some point.

Then again, watching the repository will ultimately be like
subscribing to llvm-commits, won't it? How many people do _that_ and
actually track what happens? I personally can't imagine doing that
without some serious automatic filtering...

Not sure what you mean by "actually track what happens."
I subscribe, and I skim the subject lines nearly every day, to see
whether anything interesting has happened. I actually *read* maybe
1 or 2 percent of the traffic. In order for automatic filtering to
work, I'd need to decide ahead of time what keywords and/or people to
care about. I'd rather not look at the project with such blinders in
place.
--paulr

+1

There are some of us who do this.

To the subject of this thread: is this comment feature useful for the
purpose of post-commit code review?

-Hal