llvm books

Dear All,

Did anyone read these 2 books?

https://www.packtpub.com/application-development/llvm-cookbook


LLVM Cookbook | PACKT Books
Over 80 engaging recipes that will help you build a compiler frontend, optimizer, and code generator using LLVM
Read more…
|

  • |

https://www.packtpub.com/application-development/getting-started-llvm-core-libraries


Getting Started with LLVM Core Libraries | PACKT Books
Get to grips with LLVM essentials and use the core libraries to build advanced tools
Read more…
|

  • |

Are they are really useful?

Hi Marwa,

The second book is useful. I use it often.

The book is exactly what is written in its title: getting started. It give basics of each major part of LLVM. After reading it you will be able to build it from scratch. What is most important the book shows in details how components of LLVM are built into a compiler toolchain: from front-end (clang) to back-end (optimizer and code generation). It’s demonstrated that the LLVM framework is designed as a perfect modular system which allows easily adapting it for the custom projects.

There is lack of details of LLVM structures, API and design decisions. I guess they were limited by the size of the book and time.

Anyway this is a good book to quickly start digging into LLVM.

Kind regards,

Evgeny Astigeevich

This book also sucked a lot from the public documents, which is a shame.

There's also another one that I'd like to get my hands on out of curiosity:

http://motipizza.com/catalog/impress-kitsune

cheers,
--renato

Hi Renato,

This book also sucked a lot from the public documents, which is a shame.

We cited the official docs a lot in the book, explicitly saying they
are the definitive place to look for updated guidance.
Since it's a book for beginners there's likely a lot of intersection
with official docs content, but I don't remember I or Rafael sucking
directly from them :slight_smile:
Let us know if you have examples of that, and we'll pass that up to
the editor to fix in further editions.

Thanks,

The cross-compilation chapter has entire identical phrases and the
general structure is very similar.

Of course, I'd expect any half-decent book to have the official
documentation as one of the primary sources, but not in a
paste-then-modify kind.

I was looking for that chapter in particular, given that I wrote the
original docs on cross-compilations, and I know I didn't do a good job
at it. I was expecting a more thorough description of the issues,
system particularities, toolchains you can choose and how, but it
ended up being as lacking as my original docs, which is a shame,
really.

cheers,
--renato

Yeah I am reading the second one while teaching myself compilers and language theory. It’s good.

Hi Renato,

Let us know if you have examples of that, and we'll pass that up to
the editor to fix in further editions.

The cross-compilation chapter has entire identical phrases and the
general structure is very similar.

Of course, I'd expect any half-decent book to have the official
documentation as one of the primary sources, but not in a
paste-then-modify kind.

I was looking for that chapter in particular, given that I wrote the
original docs on cross-compilations, and I know I didn't do a good job
at it. I was expecting a more thorough description of the issues,
system particularities, toolchains you can choose and how, but it
ended up being as lacking as my original docs, which is a shame,
really.

I agree that it could have covered more topics and etc, but it was out
of our intended scope.
I double checked in the cross-compilation chapter and I don't find the
general structure similar nor did find identical phrases :slight_smile:
We do in fact use the same generic triple used in the docs
"<arch><sub>-<vendor>-<sys>-<abi>", but this one was intentional, as
to make it easier for the reader to relate the content on the book
with stuff in the official docs.

Thanks for the feedback,

I agree that it could have covered more topics and etc, but it was out
of our intended scope.

I understand, not many people are interested in cross-compilation... :slight_smile:

I double checked in the cross-compilation chapter and I don't find the
general structure similar nor did find identical phrases :slight_smile:

It's probably me reading it with the same mind set. :slight_smile:

Sorry about that.

We do in fact use the same generic triple used in the docs
"<arch><sub>-<vendor>-<sys>-<abi>", but this one was intentional, as
to make it easier for the reader to relate the content on the book
with stuff in the official docs.

Makes sense.

cheers,
--renato