[llvm-commits] CVS: llvm-www/Name.html

+ <tr><td>Jeff Cohen</td><th>
+ Oscar</th>
+ <td>Oscar = Open Source Compiler And Runtime</td></tr>

Perfect, and very nice backronym. Unfortunately, Wikipedia says:

Dale Johannesen wrote:

  
+    <tr><td>Jeff Cohen</td><th>
+        Oscar</th>
+      <td>Oscar = Open Source Compiler And Runtime</td></tr>
    

Perfect, and very nice backronym.  Unfortunately, Wikipedia says:

  
Both Oscar and Academy Award are registered trademarks of the  
Academy [of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences],
fiercely protected through litigation and threats thereof.

It’s not that simple. If LLVM had anything to do with the entertainment industry, or if it used a golden statue as its icon, you’re right, they would sue and win. But you are free to name your child Oscar, and they will not (can not) sue. Nor do they sue “Oscar Mayer”, well-known maker of hot dogs and operator of the Wienermobile.

Furthermore, a simple google shows that there are several open source projects named OSCAR:

  • oscar.openclustergroup.org - Open Source Cluster Application Resources

    • A bundle of software for making Linux clusters. Source code, hardware notes, and documentation
    • Reinventing mobility an open source project about inventing hardware.
  • oscar.objectweb.org - The OW2 Consortium is an open source software community aiming at developing component-based middleware for large scale distributed systems.

  • oscar.symplicity.com -OSCAR - Online System for Clerkship Application and Review
    and others… What’s one more?

Dale Johannesen wrote:

+ <tr><td>Jeff Cohen</td><th>
+ Oscar</th>
+ <td>Oscar = Open Source Compiler And Runtime</td></tr>

Perfect, and very nice backronym. Unfortunately, Wikipedia says:

Both Oscar and Academy Award are registered trademarks of the Academy [of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences],
fiercely protected through litigation and threats thereof.

Wikipedia also says (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trademark):

It is important to note that trademark rights generally arise out of the use and/or registration (see below) of a mark in connection only with a specific type or range of products or services. Although it may sometimes be possible to take legal action to prevent the use of a mark in relation to products or services outside this range, this does not mean that trademark law prevents the use of that mark by the general public. A common word, phrase, or other sign can only be removed from the public domain to the extent that a trademark owner is able to maintain exclusive rights over that sign in relation to certain products or services, assuming there are no other trademark objections.

I am not a lawyer, but I assume that the Academy will not move into the compiler business anytime soon so it shouldn't be a problem. And I really like the name.

By the way, I came up with another idea for a name (which I like less than 'OSCAR', but nevertheless...) It's 'Primordial', since the compiler is what all other software comes from. And in contrast to oscar.org, primordial.org is free for the taking..

m.

Dale Johannesen wrote:

  
+    Jeff Cohen
+        Oscar
+      Oscar = Open Source Compiler And Runtime
    
Perfect, and very nice backronym.  Unfortunately, Wikipedia says:

  
Both Oscar and Academy Award are registered trademarks of the  
Academy [of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences],
fiercely protected through litigation and threats thereof.

It’s not that simple. If LLVM had anything to do with the entertainment industry, or if it used a golden statue as its icon, you’re right, they would sue and win.

I agree, using it for something unrelated is probably legal (IANAL). I was more concerned that establishing
that might get expensive, like naming things McSomething tends to. But
if there are other open source projects using the name it is probably not a problem.

Hi Dale,

May I suggest a slight modification? In the grand tradition of Web 2.0 (not that LLVM has anything to do with it), just remove the noun.

Oscar -> Oscr

:slight_smile:

Evan