Quick question: LLVM.org documentation tool?

Hi,

I was wondering if you guys are using a tool of some sort for generating the HTML for LLVM or if you are writing it by hand? I am thinking of submitting some Windows-specific documentation because I honestly find it quite difficult to get things up and running with MINGW64. I may be daft, but so may others :slight_smile: As a former build master, I have a strong preference for documentation that assumes zero knowledge by the reader (just like a daily build system should assume zero knowledge from the host environment).

I seem to be progressing nicely on setting up a MINGW64 build slave, but it is still too early to tell for sure.

Cheers,
Mikael

Mikael Lyngvig <mikael@lyngvig.org> writes:

Hi,

I was wondering if you guys are using a tool of some sort for generating
the HTML for LLVM or if you are writing it by hand?

It is written by hand.

I am thinking of
submitting some Windows-specific documentation because I honestly find it
quite difficult to get things up and running with MINGW64. I may be daft,
but so may others :slight_smile: As a former build master, I have a strong preference
for documentation that assumes zero knowledge by the reader (just like a
daily build system should assume zero knowledge from the host environment).

Windows-related documentation relies on voluntary contributions, so
please go ahead and improve it.

I seem to be progressing nicely on setting up a MINGW64 build slave, but it
is still too early to tell for sure.

What type of problems are you experiencing? Config? Build? Compiler?
Testing? What build system are you using? (cmake or configure)

It is written by hand.

Okay, no problem.

Windows-related documentation relies on voluntary contributions, so
please go ahead and improve it.

I’ll send in a new document entitled something like “Setting up a Windows build slave” or so. I start out right from the beginning:

  1. Pick a machine to use for LLVM. Dedicate this machine to be a permanent LLVM build slave.
  2. Reinstall Windows from scratch (so as to be sure why and how you got the result you got).
  3. Create an account named Build.
  4. Configure Windows to automatically log into the Build account by doing …

What type of problems are you experiencing? Config? Build? Compiler?
Testing? What build system are you using? (cmake or configure)

The main problem was that it took me a while to figure out how to get flying. The Mingw64 site at SourceForge does not seem to provide prebuilt Windows binaries (AFAIK), so I had to resort to picking up prebuilt binaries from a code.google.com site. Also, figuring out how to get and install all the loose components that are required, took a while. Nothing overly troublesome, but I happen to believe in explicit, zero-assumption documentation so I decided to write something up so that perhaps others will take on the rather simple, yet time-consuming, task of setting up a Windows slave.

I am using CMake -G “MinGW Makefiles”, “make -j2”, and the MINGW64 binaries. I expected this to cause problems, because of the potential for incorrectly defined platform macros, but everything seems to build just fine. I probably won’t see the results of the tests until tomorrow sometime.

Much to my surprise, everything has run fine since I started the build. The main issue is that the build box is a VERY slow Intel Atom X2 1.6 GHz machine so it takes ages for it to complete the build (it has been running for three or four hours now). I have arranged to get a faster box soon, but for the time being it is all I have. So I simply cannot tell whether or not everything is okay. But at least the build hasn’t aborted and the percentage indicator is at eightysomething.

I am very optimistic as to the outcome of the build, even though I do know that some of the tools and tests aren’t fully supported on Windows.

Cheers,
Mikael