Volunteers needed for LLVM Release Team

LLVMers,

As LLVM grows and begins to support more targets and more frontends, its becoming a very large task to qualify a release. Therefore, I'm seeking a couple of active members of the community to volunteer to be a part of the LLVM release team (for 2.6+). This does not replace general user testing during the release process.

Members of this LLVM Release Team will need to be very meticulous in following instructions for release building and testing. They need to be consistent, reliable, and have an eye for detail. They will also need to be able to dedicate time to qualify a release every 3-4 months. Qualification can take as little as a day, but can also take 1-2 weeks. Each release has a minimum of 2 release candidates and takes a minimum of 1 month to complete a release. I will provide instructions on how to qualify the releases initially, but this process can evolve over time with input from the release team.

Ideally, I'd like to have a volunteer for each target that we have traditionally supported and those in active use/development. If you see a target that you would like to volunteer to qualify not listed here, please let me know.

1) Mac OS 10.5 x86 (I will qualify this target)
2) Mac OS 10.5 PPC
3) Linux x86
4) Mingw x86 (Anton do you want to continue this?)
5) Linux AMD64

If you are interested in being a part of this team, please send me an email with information about yourself, what target you want to own for releases, and why you want to be a part of the release team.

I hope to have this team in place for the 2.6 release (~Apr/May/Jun).

Thanks,
Tanya Lattner

Hello, Tanya

4) Mingw x86 (Anton do you want to continue this?)

Yes, I'm still going to prepare llvm-gcc mingw32 images. However, the
testing procedure for mingw is slightly different due to lack of
dejagnu stuff. However, I have plans to fix the main LLVM testsuite to
be more mingw32-friendly :slight_smile:

I noticed that the mingw release only contains binaries and not
libraries nor header files.
I think it would be nice if the mingw release contained the same files
as the other releases.
This would mean that people who want to use LLVM with the Haskell
bindings on Windows don't have to build and install LLVM (first
installing mingw), but they could just download binaries and install
those.

  -- Lennart

Hello,

I noticed that the mingw release only contains binaries and not
libraries nor header files.

That's correct, because headers will contain, for example, absolute
paths from the box I've built the libraries on (mostly in config.h and
llvm-config script). I won't provide neither libraries nor headers,
since I don't know how to make them 'path-neutral' without much hand
work.

This would mean that people who want to use LLVM with the Haskell
bindings on Windows don't have to build and install LLVM (first
installing mingw), but they could just download binaries and install
those.

I don't understand. If you want to use libraries / headers - then you
will need a compiler anyway. Why not spent few dozens minutes to build
LLVM?

Hi,

You don't need to install a C compiler to use LLVM from Haskell.
The ghc Haskell compiler comes with all the necessary bits to build
binaries (which happens to include a (hidden) GNU tool chain).
The header files are barely needed at all, just the include/llvm-c/*.h
files to pick up some enum values. config.h and llvm-config are not
used at all.
The .a files are needed to link everything together.

If llvm.org is not going to put up header and library files then I'll
put them somewhere myself so as to make installation smooth for
Haskell users on Windows.

  -- Lennart