[web] sub-domain

How can I or who should I talk with to add a sub-domain name? I just pushed in some doc on compiling CUDA with LLVM. It would be good to have cuda.llvm.org for example point to that page.

Jingyue

What does a subdomain do that the page you added doesn't? Just seems
like more maintenance burden (not my problem of course..)

So that people have a shorter link to go to that entry page directly. It’s especially useful for non-LLVM folks who want to try out LLVM’s CUDA support. Many researchers fall into this category btw because LLVM used to support very little CUDA. They don’t like to search llvm.org for what they want.

That's like some google inside joke, right? I'm sure the page will be
indexed the same as other llvm.org pages and if you put into google
"llvm cuda" it will likely come up high on the results (after its
indexed)

I doubt most of the traffic to that page will be people manually
typing the url.. (that's funny)

That's like some google inside joke, right? I'm sure the page will be
indexed the same as other llvm.org pages and if you put into google
"llvm cuda" it will likely come up high on the results (after its
indexed)

I doubt most of the traffic to that page will be people manually
typing the url.. (that's funny)

Your attitude is puzzling. It's one thing to express your disagreement with
a proposal; it's another to mock fellow contributors who sincerely want to
make it simpler for new users to get involved with LLVM, anticipating a
whole new area opening up now that CUDA support is shaping up.

Eli

If the content expands beyond a small single page sure that starts to
make sense. His argument was funny, at least in my mind. (Don't take
my comments so seriously)

Since CUDA is an NVIDIA tm and not even an "open" standard - it may
make sense to call the project "gpgpu" or something more generic. This
also opens the door to expand it for other related programming models
in the future. I'm not a lawyer, but there may be some rules about
claiming "cuda compatibility" as well.

To expand on the above - Is sema/parsing and maybe functional tests
being added for cuda syntax? (I realize the functional testing would
be more tricky to setup)

/* I have quite a bit of experience in this area and sincerely willing
to help if I can */

So that people have a shorter link to go to that entry page directly. It's
especially useful for non-LLVM folks who want to try out LLVM's CUDA
support. Many researchers fall into this category btw because LLVM used to
support very little CUDA. They don't like to search llvm.org for what
they want.

If your primary concern is accessibility, I would wait a week or so and see
if CompileCudaWithLLVM does/doesn't make it to the top results for "llvm
cuda" on search engines. I expect it will. AFAIK almost nobody actually
manually navigates through LLVM's docs (they are horrible for that).

If you just need a short link for a presentation or whatever, the simplest
solution might just be to use a URL shortener if you want to have a short
link. E.g. http://tinyurl.com/llvmcuda
Unless you guys are planning on putting a ton of content, I think that a
subdomain is probably overkill. We do have http://openmp.llvm.org that has
its own associated repository, -commits list, -dev list, etc. for the
openmp runtime libs. Are you guys planning on doing something similar?
Generally speaking

Another possibility is making a docs/cuda directory if you guys are
planning on putting a significant amount of documentation content. The
resulting URL for docs/cuda/index.rst would then be llvm.org/docs/cuda
which is reasonable. (be careful if you decide to do this, to not break URL
compatibility; leave the previous pages empty with a link to the new
locations)

-- Sean Silva

Hi,

If your only concern is the url length, then cuda.llvm.org/ and llvm.org/cuda/ have exactly the same number of characters. I’m not sure why a subdomain would be more appropriate here?

Thanks all for the suggestions!

Regarding the content, I expect it to grow significantly. We want to add performance numbers and instructions on performance tuning as well, so I can foresee it will grow beyond one page. We were originally thinking about something like http://polly.llvm.org/, but chose to put it under llvm.org/docs because gpucc will soon be integrated to Clang.

Nonetheless, I don’t want to over-optimize things. I think I will punt on cuda.llvm.org for now, and take less “intrusive” approaches such as llvm.org/cuda, llvm.org/docs/cuda, or /llvm-cuda. Let’s worry about that later when we really have more content.

PS: I don’t quite trust Google to get this top soon (I would be happy to see myself wrong on this though). The current top for “llvm cuda” is https://developer.nvidia.com/cuda-llvm-compiler which is quite relevant too.

So that people have a shorter link to go to that entry page directly.
It's especially useful for non-LLVM folks who want to try out LLVM's CUDA
support. Many researchers fall into this category btw because LLVM used to
support very little CUDA. They don't like to search llvm.org for what
they want.

If your primary concern is accessibility, I would wait a week or so and
see if CompileCudaWithLLVM does/doesn't make it to the top results for
"llvm cuda" on search engines. I expect it will. AFAIK almost nobody
actually manually navigates through LLVM's docs (they are horrible for
that).

If you just need a short link for a presentation or whatever, the simplest
solution might just be to use a URL shortener if you want to have a short
link. E.g. http://tinyurl.com/llvmcuda
Unless you guys are planning on putting a ton of content, I think that a
subdomain is probably overkill. We do have http://openmp.llvm.org that
has its own associated repository, -commits list, -dev list, etc. for the
openmp runtime libs. Are you guys planning on doing something similar?
Generally speaking

I can see us putting more content there, but infrastructure-wise probably
not as much as openmp.org. We don't need -commits, -dev, and -bugs mailing
lists, because the CUDA support will soon be integrated to Clang instead of
being a subproject. Our runtime if open-sourced will be a separate LLVM
subproject, which then will need a separate folder or sub-domain.

Another possibility is making a docs/cuda directory if you guys are
planning on putting a significant amount of documentation content. The
resulting URL for docs/cuda/index.rst would then be llvm.org/docs/cuda
which is reasonable. (be careful if you decide to do this, to not break URL
compatibility; leave the previous pages empty with a link to the new
locations)

Thanks. I'll consider that.

Google relevance comes with relevant content.
Think about it: If it were that easy to make a single new page rank highly, it would be as easy for spammers, and Google's search results would quickly become useless.
Add more relevant and interesting content, and you'll get better ranking automatically.
Trying to out-PR Nvidia's PR staff and have your work listed ahead of Nvidia's LLVM/CUDA work is going to be a waste of effort. Consider using a different moniker than CUDA; if you're lucky, it's more appropriate to your work (e.g. if you're really doing OpenCL and CUDA is just an add-on, say "OpenCL" instead of "CUDA")

Just my 2c.
Regards,
Jo