Dividing statements

Hi,

I have a sentence like this:

method( b ) , a = 3 , b++;

This sentence is a statement composed of three substatements. What I need is to difference those three substatements which are between commas to save them in a list:

Statement 1 → method( b )
Statement 2-> a = 3
Statement 3 → b++

So I tried using the “child_iterator” in the class Stmt, which I though it would be easy.
In the first iteration, the statement is subdivided in:

[method( b ) , a = 3] and [b++;]

The first sentence is then subdivided again in:

[method( b )] and [a = 3]

The problem is that I don’t know when I should stop the division because, now, the first statement is divided again to my surprise, taking the argument “b” as a new statement. Thus, I’m getting more than three statements, what is a major issue in my case.

Is there any way to count the number of statements separated by commas? Why it doesn’t exist the reverse iterator? In that way, I could compare when a statement processed in the child_iterator is the same as the first statement divided in the reverse iterator.

Thanks in advance,

Pedro.

Hi Pedro,

What’s happening is that the comma operator can only take two expressions. When more than two expressions are joined with commas, the first two are joined by the comma operator, then that result is joined with expression, then that result is joined to the next expression and so on. So something like:

a, b, c, d;

is structurally similiar to:

(((a, b), c), d);

Instead of processing every sub-statement, you only need to process sub-statements when the current statement is the comma operator (that is, the statement is a BinaryOperator with comma opcode). If it is, the right Expr* is the last statement and the left Expr* is either the first statement, or another comma operator which you need to recurse on.

Hi Pedro,

Hi,

I have a sentence like this:

method( b ) , a = 3 , b++;

This sentence is a statement composed of three substatements. What I need is
to difference those three substatements which are between commas to save
them in a list:

Statement 1 -> method( b )
Statement 2-> a = 3
Statement 3 -> b++

So I tried using the "child_iterator" in the class Stmt, which I though it
would be easy.
In the first iteration, the statement is subdivided in:

[method( b ) , a = 3] and [b++;]

The first sentence is then subdivided again in:

[method( b )] and [a = 3]

The problem is that I don't know when I should stop the division because,
now, the first statement is divided again to my surprise, taking the
argument "b" as a new statement. Thus, I'm getting more than three
statements, what is a major issue in my case.

Is there any way to count the number of statements separated by commas?

"You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means."

In C++ the word "statement" has a precise meaning. There is no such
thing in C++ as "substatement".

Your "sentence" is _one_ statement. It contains an expression (whose
result you're throwing away, but that's normal).

There is no such thing as "statements separated by commas". There's
not even "expressions separated by commas".
You have been tricked by the fact that evaluation of comma expressions
proceeds from left to right, into believing that the expression is
represented as a linear data structure. It's not. It's a tree.
Here's the output of clang -cc1 -ast-dump:

    `-BinaryOperator 0x6000c4d78 <line:9:3, col:47> 'int' ','
      >-BinaryOperator 0x6000c4d08 <col:3, col:31> 'int' ','
      > >-CallExpr 0x6000c4c50 <col:3, col:13> 'void'
      > > >-ImplicitCastExpr 0x6000c4c38 <col:3> 'void (*)(int)'
<FunctionToPointerDecay>
      > > > `-DeclRefExpr 0x6000c4bc0 <col:3> 'void (int)' Function
0x60007e640 'method' 'void (int)'
      > > `-ImplicitCastExpr 0x6000c4c80 <col:11> 'int' <LValueToRValue>
      > > `-DeclRefExpr 0x6000c4be8 <col:11> 'int' lvalue Var
0x60007e8f0 'b' 'int'
      > `-BinaryOperator 0x6000c4ce0 <col:27, col:31> 'int' '='
      > >-DeclRefExpr 0x6000c4c98 <col:27> 'int' lvalue Var
0x60007e880 'a' 'int'
      > `-IntegerLiteral 0x6000c4cc0 <col:31> 'int' 3
      `-UnaryOperator 0x6000c4d58 <col:46, col:47> 'int' postfix '++'
        `-DeclRefExpr 0x6000c4d30 <col:46> 'int' lvalue Var
0x60007e8f0 'b' 'int'

What you have is a binary expression: a comma operator and its two
operands. One of the operands is a binary expression: a comma operator
and its operands.

You could perhaps try to navigate this tree and stop if the
BinaryOperator is not a ',' .

Csaba