regression bisecting

What are most people using to bisect svn or git in order to find llvm regressions?

For example, something on Sunday made one test for mips16 fail and I was wondering if there is some simple script people already have for zeroing in on the change that made something not regress.

Tia.

Reed

What are most people using to bisect svn or git in order to find llvm regressions?

For example, something on Sunday made one test for mips16 fail and I was wondering if there is some simple script people already have for zeroing in on the change that made something not regress.

that made something regress....

Hi Reed,

What are most people using to bisect svn or git in order to find llvm
regressions?

Do you mean some script to use with "git bisect run"? I've not seen
one; I suspect the simple cases are too easy to spot and the hard ones
too diverse to be worth it

For example, something on Sunday made one test for mips16 fail

For a failing test you probably just need to put "make llc &&
bin/llvm-lit /path/to/test" into a file and use that wouldn't you
(assuming an llc failure)? It's completely untested, I've never quite
had the courage to trust automated bisection and verify mine by hand.

Cheers.

Tim.

The other thing is that bisect arose (in the context of VCS) in the git
world, where I gather part of what makes it effective is that development
happens in terms of merging branches, so there's less "cross contamination"
between different streams of changes. I'm not sure how useful automated
bisection would be with a "everything goes on to ToT" world of LLVM's SVN.

Cheers,
Dave

I tend to use svn-bisect for that, manually duplicating the revision in
tools/clang as needed.

Joerg

Also, there is the following git tree:

https://github.com/chapuni/llvm-project.git

Which contains all LLVM projects in one repository which makes bisecting clang a lot easier.

Tobias